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A FEW IMPORTANT FACTS

NUMBER OF ABORIGINAL KIDS IN CARE

 As mentioned in the last SNAICC newsletter (March 2011) “Despite the Bringing Them Home Report, the last ten years has seen a rapid increase in both the number of our children being removed from their families for child protection reasons and the number being placed with non-Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander families.” (SNAICC Newsletter March 2011 p5). According to the Australian Institute of Health and Welfare (AIHW) report, Child Protection Australia 2009-10 “Across Australia, the rate of Indigenous children on orders was nine times higher than that of non-Indigenous children (AIHW 2011 p38)

 In June 2010, there were 35,895 children in out-of-home care in Australia, 32% or 11,468 of these were Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander children an increase of 9% since 30 June 2009. (AIHW 2011 p48). Of these 11,468 Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children in out-of-home care, 48% ie 5,465 children are in NSW (AIHW 2011 p50). “Across Australia, 71% of Indigenous children were placed with relatives/kin, other Indigenous caregivers or in Indigenous residential care” (AIHW 2011 p50). At 30 June 2010, 46% of the children (in out-of-home care) were in relative/kinship care

References

  • AIHW 2011. Child protection Australia 2009-10. Child welfare series no. 51. Cat. no. CWS 39. Canberra: AIH
  • Secretariat of National Aboriginal & Islander Child Care (SNAICC)  Newsletter March 2011 located at   http://www.snaicc.asn.au/_uploads/rsfil/02579.pdf

 RESEARCH ON THE VALUE OF KINSHIP CARE

International research has found significant benefits for children and young people in kinship care, including:

  • feeling loved, cared for and valued;
  • maintaining a sense of identity and belonging and feeling settled because they were family;
  • more stable placements than for children placed in foster care;
  • fewer placement moves;
  • maintenance of contact with family and friends.

References

Mackiewicz (2009) and McHugh (2009)

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